Thursday, 28 August, 2014

No story is like a wheeled vehicle whose contact with the road is continuous. Stories walk, like animals or men. And their steps are not only between narrated events but between each sentence, sometimes each word. Every step is a stride over something not said.

The suspense story is a modern invention…and consequently today one may tend to overestimate the role of suspense, the waiting-for-the-end, in story-telling. The essential tension in a story lies elsewhere. Not so much in the mystery of its destination as in the mystery of the spaces between its steps towards that destination.

All stories are discontinuous and are based on a tacit agreement about what is not said, about what connects the discontinuities. The question then arises: Who makes this agreement with whom? One is tempted to reply: The teller and the listener. Yet neither teller nor listener is at the centre of the story: they are at its periphery. Those whom the story is about are at the centre. It is between their actions and attributes and reactions that the unstated connections are being made.

— From Another Way of Telling, by John Berger and Jean Mohr
Thursday, 17 July, 2014
Louise Bourgeois

Louise Bourgeois

Wednesday, 16 July, 2014
Barbara Kruger, Untitled (You Construct Intricate Rituals), 1981

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (You Construct Intricate Rituals), 1981

Tuesday, 15 July, 2014
Woolf’s sense of privacy still feels relevant; when I keep it in mind, I see it everywhere. Adelle Waldman’s novel “The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.” is, among many other things, a gender-reversed retelling of the love story at the center of “Mrs. Dalloway”: like Clarissa, Nate chooses the lover who can’t know him over the lover who’s determined to. (He does this, in part, so that he can continue to surprise himself—that is, continue to create.) Meanwhile, on Tumblr and Facebook, we seek out the same private sociality that Woolf described. Usually, we think of social media as a forum for exhibitionism. But, inevitably, the extroverted cataloguing of everyday minutiae—meals, workouts, thoughts about politics, books, and music—reaches its own limits; it ends up emphasizing what can’t be shared. Talking so freely about your life helps you to know the weight of those feelings which are too vague, or too spiritual, to express—left unspoken and unexplored, they throw your own private existence into relief. “Sharing” is, in fact, the opposite of what we do: like one of Woolf’s hostesses, we rehearse a limited openness so that we can feel the solidity of our own private selves. — Joshua Rothman, “Virginia Woolf’s Idea of Privacy,” The New Yorker
Thursday, 10 July, 2014

I’m Nobody! Who are you? (260), by Emily Dickinson

I’m Nobody! Who are you?
Are you – Nobody – too?
Then there’s a pair of us!
Don’t tell! they’d advertise – you know!

How dreary – to be – Somebody!
How public – like a Frog –
To tell one’s name – the livelong June –
To an admiring Bog!

I am sure that, without theatre, there is no urban public space, not even classic public space deserving of that name. We therefore have good reason to reflect on the contemporariness and function of theatre among this country’s active public.  Alexander Kluge, opening to Berlin Festspiele Theatretreffen 2014.
Wednesday, 9 July, 2014
#cherchezlafemme

#cherchezlafemme

Tuesday, 8 July, 2014
Pat Brassington, By the Way, 2010

Pat Brassington, By the Way, 2010

The best and most important news: You already have the skills you need to build a beautiful, sustainable life.

The secret of artists who make it work: they use the skills, resourcefulness, and creativity of their art practice in all aspects of their lives. Artists are over-skilled and work incredibly hard. We see value where others do not. We are brilliant problem-solvers and tool-users. We have the meta-skill of learning new skills.

If I said to you, “I want to make a performance that involves two hot-air balloons, a children’s chorus, and some trained cats.” You would say, “OK, let’s figure it out.” Because you are an artist and because you believe fundamentally that things can be figured out, transformed, adapted, and solved.

You have experience making the impossible happen. All too often, we don’t use those skills outside the studio. When it’s time to make a budget or do our taxes or have a meeting with a fancy funder, we say: “Oh, no I can’t do that. I’m an artist.”

— From Making Your Life As An Artist, by Andrew Simonet. This is a guide to “building a balanced, sustainable artistic life,” and is full of good, practical advice and #quotesabouthardwork. You can download it for yourself, for free, here. ”Don’t starve. Make art.”
Tuesday, 1 July, 2014
All of Scotland is our stage. In our heart is an ambition to transform the world in dreams and drama, to make incredible things happen in unbelievable places. We’re where Scotland comes to play. We’re an ever-evolving family of play makers, theatre originals, maverick thinkers. We’re technically adventurous, fearlessly collaborative. We’re what our artists, performers and participants make us. And with no building of our own, we have the freedom to go where our audiences take us. There is no limit to what we believe theatre can be, no limit to the stories we are able to tell. All of Scotland is our stage, and on that stage we perform to the world. We are a theatre of the imagine: a Theatre Without Walls. — National Theatre of Scotland
Tuesday, 24 June, 2014

Our Many Never Endings, by Courtney Queeney

You entered the bedroom and fell to your knees.
I wait the rest of my life to hear you say, I made a mistake.

Inside my chest, a mangle.
Inside yours, a deflating balloon.

You took the vacuum cleaner, the ironing board, the dish rack
and left me some lint, an iron to scorch shirts, one chipped plate.

I would like to say at least we perfected
entrances and exits, like professional stage actors

honing their craft, but even that’s a fantasy.
Mostly on TV the lions ate the hyenas

but sometimes the hyenas
formed a posse, and tore a lion up.

Occasionally you came in out of the rain
and I was glad to have you.

Monday, 23 June, 2014 Monday, 16 June, 2014
Detail of Christina Henri, Departures and Arrivals (900 Bonnets)

"I was searching for a way to communicate the grief experienced by convict women at their unjust treatment. I spent months experimenting with a variety of art investigations at the Female Factory Historic Site in South Hobart, Tasmania.
One day I was away from the Site at another historic establishment, Narryna Heritage Museum in Battery Point, and I stumbled across a large number of white boxes containing baby’s christening bonnets. I reflected on how colonial mothers in all levels of society had suffered from the loss of their young. For the upper classes though they had ways of dealing with their grief and building monuments to pay tribute to their loved ones. Convict women, on the other hand, were afforded no such avenues and given no consideration during their time of anguish.
It was then the idea came to me to create an installation incorporating images of the beautiful christening bonnets arranged in such a way as to be a moving evocative memorial.”

Detail of Christina Henri, Departures and Arrivals (900 Bonnets)

"I was searching for a way to communicate the grief experienced by convict women at their unjust treatment. I spent months experimenting with a variety of art investigations at the Female Factory Historic Site in South Hobart, Tasmania.

One day I was away from the Site at another historic establishment, Narryna Heritage Museum in Battery Point, and I stumbled across a large number of white boxes containing baby’s christening bonnets. I reflected on how colonial mothers in all levels of society had suffered from the loss of their young. For the upper classes though they had ways of dealing with their grief and building monuments to pay tribute to their loved ones. Convict women, on the other hand, were afforded no such avenues and given no consideration during their time of anguish.

It was then the idea came to me to create an installation incorporating images of the beautiful christening bonnets arranged in such a way as to be a moving evocative memorial.”

An important heritage site and beautiful and respectful interpretation of convict women’s experiences (at Cascades Female Factory)

An important heritage site and beautiful and respectful interpretation of convict women’s experiences (at Cascades Female Factory)

Sunday, 15 June, 2014
at Port Arthur Historical Site

at Port Arthur Historical Site