Thursday, 27 March, 2014
James Wyeth, Pumpkinhead (Self-Portrait), 1972

James Wyeth, Pumpkinhead (Self-Portrait), 1972

N. C. Wyeth, Nightfall, 1945
(via)

N. C. Wyeth, Nightfall, 1945

(via)

Andrew Wyeth, Winter, 1946

Winter 1946 is one of the artist’s most autobiographical works, painted immediately after the death of his father, the celebrated illustrator N. C. Wyeth. According to the artist, the hill became a symbolic portrait of his father, and the figure of the boy, Allan Lynch, running aimlessly “was me, at a loss—that hand drifting in the air was my free soul, groping.” Even without this story, the image is troubling: a dark, jagged form set awkwardly against an oceanic swell of brown. A skilled dramatist, Wyeth eliminates all distracting elements from the scene. The boy and his thoughts are visually isolated, his eyes averted. Further deepening the physical and emotional alienation of the boy, the artist has us look down upon the scene from an improbable height. The heightened clarity of the picture results from Wyeth’s use of the egg tempera medium: ground earth and mineral colors mixed with yolk and thinned with water. Wyeth once admitted he likes tempera for its “feeling of dry lostness.” —ncmoa.org

(via annearchal)

Andrew Wyeth, Winter, 1946

Winter 1946 is one of the artist’s most autobiographical works, painted immediately after the death of his father, the celebrated illustrator N. C. Wyeth. According to the artist, the hill became a symbolic portrait of his father, and the figure of the boy, Allan Lynch, running aimlessly “was me, at a loss—that hand drifting in the air was my free soul, groping.” Even without this story, the image is troubling: a dark, jagged form set awkwardly against an oceanic swell of brown. A skilled dramatist, Wyeth eliminates all distracting elements from the scene. The boy and his thoughts are visually isolated, his eyes averted. Further deepening the physical and emotional alienation of the boy, the artist has us look down upon the scene from an improbable height. The heightened clarity of the picture results from Wyeth’s use of the egg tempera medium: ground earth and mineral colors mixed with yolk and thinned with water. Wyeth once admitted he likes tempera for its “feeling of dry lostness.” —ncmoa.org

(via annearchal)

Wednesday, 26 March, 2014
Andrew Wyeth, Public Sale, 1943 (via New York Times)
"[I]nspired by an estate auction in Lancaster County, Pa., following the death of a farmer’s wife. It evokes the end of a family-run farm."

Andrew Wyeth, Public Sale, 1943 (via New York Times)

"[I]nspired by an estate auction in Lancaster County, Pa., following the death of a farmer’s wife. It evokes the end of a family-run farm."

Andrew Wyeth, Christina’s World, 1948 (via MoMA)

Andrew Wyeth, Christina’s World, 1948 (via MoMA)

Wednesday, 26 June, 2013
Sade Carrington, Purnululu Night Sky

Sade Carrington, Purnululu Night Sky

Friday, 21 June, 2013
Russia, early 1950s. A photo by Henri Cartier-Bresson (via harvestheart)

Russia, early 1950s. A photo by Henri Cartier-Bresson (via harvestheart)

image
Thursday, 13 June, 2013 Tuesday, 28 May, 2013 Thursday, 25 October, 2012
guardianartanddesign:


Jacob Sutton’s best photograph: a dancer’s release
‘Immediately after this, Jonah hit the floor – hard. He’s a dancer: I love the commitment in his fall’

guardianartanddesign:

Jacob Sutton’s best photograph: a dancer’s release

‘Immediately after this, Jonah hit the floor – hard. He’s a dancer: I love the commitment in his fall’

Friday, 6 July, 2012
From Evžen Sobek’s Life in Blue series.

From Evžen Sobek’s Life in Blue series.

From Evžen Sobek’s Life in Blue series.

From Evžen Sobek’s Life in Blue series.

From Evžen Sobek’s Life in Blue series.

From Evžen Sobek’s Life in Blue series.

From Evžen Sobek’s Life in Blue series.

From Evžen Sobek’s Life in Blue series.

Saturday, 2 June, 2012
Yayoi Kusama, “Self-Obliteration No.2,” 1967

Yayoi Kusama, “Self-Obliteration No.2,” 1967